Low(er)-Cost Test Makes WiGig Even More Attractive | Test.Pass

Saying you want WiGig (IEEE 802.11ad) for its wide swaths of spectrum and 7-Gb/s data rates is kind of like asking to move to the Arctic for wide-open space and loads and loads of free ice: You can have it, but at what cost? For designers, the cost factor starts to hit home when it comes time to start testing ICs and systems. Oops! But Tektronix’s new SignalVu option, the SV30, may get you over the hump.

Source: Low(er)-Cost Test Makes WiGig Even More Attractive | Test.Pass

Veniam raises $22M to bring Wi-Fi to buses and cabs, will expand to Singapore next | Global Services Media

Veniam, which provides mesh network for automobiles, has raised a $22 million Series B round to bring Wi-Fi hotspots to more vehicles. The latest investment includes funding from Verizon Ventures, Cisco Investments, Orange Digital Ventures*, Yamaha Motor Ventures, True Ventures, Union Square Ventures, and Cane Investments. The company plans on using the funds to bring its platform and managed services to more of the world, moving beyond its initial market in Portugal.

Source: Veniam raises $22M to bring Wi-Fi to buses and cabs, will expand to Singapore next | Global Services Media

Are smart cities inevitable or do tech-filled towns need careful planning? | TechRadar

The smart city is where the Internet of Things and big data crash into each other. Myriad devices fitted with sensors gathering data are instantly cross-referenced on a citywide scale to increase efficiency and create new services.

Source: Are smart cities inevitable or do tech-filled towns need careful planning? | TechRadar

If Apple doesn’t launch an 802.11ah router, will anyone?

Last month, news sites of various stripes lit up with a birth announcement: the Wi-Fi Alliance had delivered the final version of a bouncing baby standard: 802.11ah. Christened “HaLow”, the latest addition to the Wi-Fi family brings a very different set of enhancements than most of its earlier well-known siblings. The popular progression of 802.11b, -g, -a, -n, and -ac brought sequentially higher data rates and frequencies, pushing the principles of Moore’s law into wireless networking.

Source: If Apple doesn’t launch an 802.11ah router, will anyone?