Your Apps, Please? China Shows how Surveillance Leads to Intimidation and Software Censorship | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Xinjiang, home of the China’s muslim Uighur minority, has long been the world’s laboratory for Internet repression. Faced with widespread local unrest, and online debate, China has done everything it can to enforce its vision of the Net in the region, from imprisoning bloggers and online publishers, to quarantining the entire Xinjiang network from the rest of the Internet for over ten months in 2009. Nonetheless, Xinjiang residents still circumvent censorship and surveillance in the pursuit of privacy and f

Source: Your Apps, Please? China Shows how Surveillance Leads to Intimidation and Software Censorship | Electronic Frontier Foundation

China tells local cloud storage vaults to name suspected pirates • The Register

China’s has issued strong advice to local cloud storage operators that they need to stop hosting copyrighted material.

The National Copyright Administration has told local companies they must not just follow copyright laws, but implement technological and human-operated processes to identify and remove copyrighted works and also prevent material being uploaded.

The statement also calls for cloud storage operators to build systems that can detect odd-looking upload or download patterns and shut down user accounts when such activity is detected. It also calls for storage clouds to record comprehensive information about users and, if copyright infringement is suspected, pass those details to the relevant authorities.

Source: China tells local cloud storage vaults to name suspected pirates • The Register

China cracks down further on VPNs as censorship intensifies • The Register

China’s government is cracking down further on the use of virtual private networks to circumnavigate its Great Firewall, as part of the ongoing game of whack-a-mole between censors and an increasingly tech-savvy population.

Charlie Smith, co-founder of the censorship in China monitoring site GreatFire.org, said there has been a significant increase in the usage of VPN services over the last year.

“This is a direct result of the authorities blocking more websites in China, causing huge inconvenience,” he said. The knock-on effects of this can be seen through increased activity on blocked sites such as Twitter.

However, Smith said the authorities have recently cracked down hard on the most popular commercial VPNs.

Source: China cracks down further on VPNs as censorship intensifies • The Register