‎Open Source Hardware Definition, Summit & Logo

← Older revision Revision as of 10:53, 3 January 2019
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In the meantime, a group of stakeholders had continued to iterate the Open Source Hardware Definition, with significant contributions from David Mellis and Windell Oskay, and made version 0.3 public on July 13, 2010 (Freedom Defined). Through feedback and contributions from the public, over a period of several months, the definition continued to be discussed and refined. The Open Source Hardware Definition 1.0 is the current the stable version.
 
In the meantime, a group of stakeholders had continued to iterate the Open Source Hardware Definition, with significant contributions from David Mellis and Windell Oskay, and made version 0.3 public on July 13, 2010 (Freedom Defined). Through feedback and contributions from the public, over a period of several months, the definition continued to be discussed and refined. The Open Source Hardware Definition 1.0 is the current the stable version.
   
In December 2010, Nathan Seidle sent an email to the summit’s mailing list proposing the adoption of an open source hardware logo created by SparkFun’s designer. Seidle wanted to somehow indicate on SparkFun’s products that they were open source and a logo/stamp was needed. Bdeir suggested that the logo created for the Open Hardware summit be used instead, and Jonathan Kuniholm proposed that the OHANDA logo be adopted. A long discussion ensued not just on the topic of the logo, but also on the status of the definition and the need for higher cohesion amongst open source hardware stakeholders. Eventually, the OSHW Definition 1.0 was released on February 10th, 2011 (Bdeir 2011a) and endorsed by the majority of those involved. It was also decided to hold a design competition for the logo. The competition received 129 submissions, from which 10 were selected, by a group of stakeholders invited by Bdeir, and put up for public vote. On April 7, 2011 the group announced that the design “Golden Orb” by Macklin Chaffee had received the most votes (Bdeir 2011b) and consequently been selected as the symbol of agreement with and abidance by the [[OSHW Definition]]. The first open source hardware developer to apply this community mark on a product was Parallax and it has since been used on an increasing number of projects and products.
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In December 2010, Nathan Seidle sent an email to the summit’s mailing list proposing the adoption of an open source hardware logo created by SparkFun’s designer. Seidle wanted to somehow indicate on SparkFun’s products that they were open source and a logo/stamp was needed. Bdeir suggested that the logo created for the Open Hardware summit be used instead, and Jonathan Kuniholm proposed that the OHANDA logo be adopted. A long discussion ensued not just on the topic of the logo, but also on the status of the definition and the need for higher cohesion amongst open source hardware stakeholders. Eventually, the OSHW Definition 1.0 was released on February 10th, 2011 (Bdeir 2011a) and endorsed by the majority of those involved. It was also decided to hold a design competition for the logo. The competition received 129 submissions, from which 10 were selected, by a group of stakeholders invited by Bdeir, and put up for public vote. On April 7, 2011 the group announced that the design “Golden Orb” by Macklin Chaffee had received the most votes (Bdeir 2011b) and consequently been selected as the symbol of agreement with and abidance by the [[Open Source Hardware Definition|OSHW Definition]]. The first open source hardware developer to apply this community mark on a product was Parallax and it has since been used on an increasing number of projects and products.
   
 
==[[CERN Open Hardware License]]==
 
==[[CERN Open Hardware License]]==

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